Peter Kavanagh's

 

PK's is a real gem of a pub, and one I never hesitate to recommend to visitors. Originally the premises were just the end building on Egerton Street, but over the years it has expanded to take in a couple of the adjoining houses.

The pub splits comfortably into the main area, which is large enough to hold 15 or 20 ceilidh musicians plus the audience, or a couple of dozen quiz teams, or you and all your mates. After a couple of hours, all your mates will probably be mates with the person at the next table and all his mates, and by the end of the night most people in the pub are in a state of gently raucous bonhomie. During any lull in the conversation, take a scan at the knick-knacks scattered about the place. Big breweries spend a great deal of money faking this sort of look in their most profitable new outlets. Highlights include a very dusty, crusty looking old alligator skin high up on the back wall. One night, a friend of mine got a fright when something landed on the seat next to her - it was a part which had fallen from one of the 1960's radios hanging from the ceiling.

Then there's the bar, where you'll get into a conversation whether you like it or not. This is the place to be if you spend more time in the pub than at home. You'll have access to a steady stream of like-minded people, and there's always the chance of getting included in someone's round. Mine's a Guinness!

Lastly, the two snugs with their roaring fires in winter. The back room is  reserved for non-smokers (almost unique in a 'proper' pub in Liverpool) There's stained glass windows, comic Victorian scenes painted on the walls, carved wooden benches, and very special arrangements for the fag ends.

On the rare occasions we get a warm evening, there's a couple of tables outside where you can soak up the rays.

Click to enlarge
Original watercolour by John Price, 1923.
450x300mm. Collection Peter Richardson


Click to enlarge


Lorraine outside PK's

This psychedelic scene is Lorraine and some beer, outside Kavanagh's one sunny evening. It was shot with the amazing Lomo Actionsampler, which takes a sequence of four shots on one 35mm negative.